Buyers In Sheep’s Clothing

It is usually articles in well circulated publications titled “Buyer’s Beware” that frighten the you-know-what out of the readers when it comes to the shady underworld of horse sellers. As a seller of Thoroughbreds for the competition world, I’ve gone through great lengths of marketing all my horses with clear and honest representation. I’ve been told numerous times that honesty is a rare trait in the horse world, and I can agree. But it goes both ways as a buyer and as a seller.

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I vet buyers before they come to the farm to try the horses. I ask questions relevant to what their requirements are and then I tell them what mine are in order to buy a horse from me. Some may consider it intrusive of me. . . I think its smart.

For some strange reason there seems to be an influx of potential buyers who shall I say, are a smidge dishonest and come from La-La Land. The meetings are always a learning experience, very memorable and downright frustrating.

I hope to provide fellow sellers a peek into my experiences and how even the sweetest looking buyer in breeches is potentially someone in sheep’s clothing. Here is a list of interesting and true tidbits that will leave you nodding, shaking your head, laughing, and slack-jawed.

  • I use to ride at the Intermediate Level of Eventing in the 1990’s.
  • I was on the ‘Real Housewives’. I’m sort of a celebrity.
  • I’m close friends with George, Joe, Karen and Bruce.
  • I want my vet to do the prepurchase exam. You’re going to have haul to their clinic in South Carolina, or Florida, or Alabama before I decide if I want your horse.
  • Your horse must pass a prepurchase exam 100%.
  • I don’t like chestnut mares even though there’s zero scientific evidence to the fake stereotypes.
  • My dream is to ride in the Olympics. Can this horse take me there?
  • I want to ride in the Rolex 3-Day in 2 years. I only want to spend between $2K – $5K for a horse.
  • I know everything there is about Thoroughbreds and racing. I took a class.
  • I have to sell my horse first before buying a new one.
  • I just started looking for my perfect unicorn. Your gray fits everything I’m looking for and then some. But I need to try 20 more horses before I make a decision.
  • Can I come back and ride your horse a second, third, fourth time?
  • I’d need to take your horse on trial for 30 days before I decide on buying.
  • How do I know your horse can jump?

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  • I spoke to my trainer and she said since you won’t pay her a finder’s fee, she told me to look at other horses.
  • I keep my horses on pasture board. I take their shoes off. I only feed Bermuda and Fescue hay.
  • I weigh 200 lbs. and I’m 5’4″. I want to buy a horse to help me lose weight.
  • My 12 year old child can ride anything. She jumps 4′ fences on a 31 year old local school horse.
  • Woman wears $1200 custom Italian boots and a Rolex, but offers less than half the price of the horse.
  • Can you make video of your horse free jumping, loading on a trailer, standing while being groomed and get it to me by this afternoon. I want to make sure it’s husband/boyfriend safe.

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My final experience is a doosey! After wasting my time for over 7 hours, and the person was still not making a decision to purchasing a horse, I was asked, “Is this horse fast?”

Exhausted, we walked out to the back pasture, I opened the gate and took the bridle off. I smiled at the person and slapped the horse on the rump and watched him gallop full speed down the hill and out of sight. “Was that fast enough for you?” I asked.

So to the buyers out there, I want you to know that I’m a straight shooter and I want to sell you one of my horses only if you’re honest with me and don’t play games. You’ll be lucky to have one of my Thoroughbreds to call your own.

Don’t be that person in sheep’s clothing.

GO Thoroughbred – GO Little Kentucky Farm!

 

 

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